GoodAh!!!

GoodAh!!!

Did you know that the famous Filipino term tapsi / tapsilog pertaining to tapa+ sinangag+ itlog was coined by GoodAh!!!? (Tapsilog is cured meat+fried rice+egg.)

Nostalgia hits (at least anybody around my age or older) when you see GoodAh!!!. I remember when I was younger and way too eager to learn how to swim, our parents would take us to Celebrity Sports Plaza in Quezon City, and that swim sesh was always followed by a ‘refueling’ meal at GoodAh!!! (Gosh those three exclamation points, though!)

If there was anything it was good at besides their tapsilog, it was marketing. Almost anyone who’s ever been to GoodAh!!! will remember it is “Open 25 hours,” and that they serve food that is “Good for every-all.” These lines, these double-take worthy lines.  Continue reading “GoodAh!!!”

My Filipino-Style Korean Beef Stew

My Filipino-Style Korean Beef Stew

Growing up, my mom’s only slow cooker recipe was Korean beef stew. It was sweet and there are cute sesame seeds floating on top. Falling off the bones tender, it was always a hit among my siblings and I.

Then in 2006, I went to Korea to become a flight attendant, knowing only one dish I could probably survive with. In a few weeks of training, I tried to learn the language to the best of my ability (well, I know how to read the characters) because it’s quite difficult to go out and just make assumptions about the food. I tracked down the beef stew which translated to 갈비찜 (gal-bi-jjim), but it was nowhere near what my mom cooked.

After a year with the airline–my tolerance for spicy food has become significantly higher–my parents were then eligible for free tickets. They decided to go to the US, but along the way–as any [Filipino] parent would–they planned to stop by Seoul for a few days and see what my overseas life was like.

Spicy food being unpopular in our household, I warned my parents that almost everything was spicy (except if they end up at an Italian restaurant or a bakery). My mom said, “Well, just tell me where to get Korean beef stew and I’ll be fine.”  Continue reading “My Filipino-Style Korean Beef Stew”

Ginisang Baguio Beans with Pork Giniling

Ginisang Baguio Beans with Pork Giniling

For non-Filipino readers: “Ginisa” is sauteed, “Baguio beans” refers to green beans, and “giniling” is anything that’s been ground. So this Filipino dish translates to Sauteed Green Beans with Ground Pork.

I have this budding newfound love with tomatoes. You see, I’m not fond of mushy things. I only like tomatoes when they’re not too ripe, otherwise it just becomes this gooey mess with very little crunch. However, when it comes to sautéed meats and vegetables, this is a must-have for me.

When I was younger, the only sautéed ingredient I could identify was actually just garlic. Regardless of whether I added onions and tomatoes, I thought only garlic made a difference.

Decades later, I’m discovering that I was probably just too impatient to let onions and tomatoes do their thing. I’m now more inclined on faux-roasted tomatoes, almost charring in the pan. Continue reading “Ginisang Baguio Beans with Pork Giniling”

Lumpiang Isda (Fried Fish Rolls)

Lumpiang Isda (Fried Fish Rolls)

Lumpia came from the Chinese, which are spring rolls that usually contain meat, vegetables and sometimes noodles. In the Philippines, we have different types of fried (and fresh) lumpia. The most common is Lumpiang Shanghai, filled usually with minced pork. Isda is the Tagalog word for fish, therefore “Lumpiang Isda” translates to Fish Rolls.

My mom used to make these fish rolls using galunggong–in English it seems to be some sort of scad–and I really never knew how tedious this was. While it is cost effective (a.k.a. cheap), making it from scratch will easily take a couple of hours of your time! And it will be gone in fifteen minutes! Continue reading “Lumpiang Isda (Fried Fish Rolls)”

Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe

Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe

Pinaputok in Filipino kind of means “bursting” as in bursting in the seams. So in this recipe, the fish is stuffed with as much chopped onions and tomatoes as possible. Drizzled with a light butter mixture (or even anything as simple as oil, seasoned with salt and pepper) then wrapped in foil to cook–usually grilled, sometimes baked. The juices of the fish mix with the onions and tomatoes, trapped inside, giving the fish an ever so slightly enhanced, fresh and clean taste.

Continue reading “Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe”

Rice Cooker Chicken Sopas

Rice Cooker Chicken Sopas

Sopas is a Spanish plural word meaning soups, which could most likely mean any kind of soup, but in the Philippines it usually refers to creamy chicken macaroni soup. Some people associate Sopas to breakfast (like myself), my husband is used to having it as a complementary soup when having rice and fried chicken/fish/pork. Continue reading “Rice Cooker Chicken Sopas”

Chicken Pochero

Chicken Pochero

My list of posts to write is getting longer every day. Cooking daily but not blogging daily? Not a good match!

If you don’t know pochero (alternate spellings include “puchero” or “putsero”)…I don’t either. All I actually remember from pochero was that it was made with chicken, tomato based sauce, and that it had banana. My mom does not cook pochero, or most of the tomato based dishes, for that matter. Continue reading “Chicken Pochero”

Bangus Sisig

Bangus Sisig

Sisig is considered the perfect beer match. It’s usually made of liver, pig ears, and probably unimaginable things–all chopped and mixed (so you don’t actually know what you’re getting), cooked on a greasy hotplate and is sometimes topped with egg. Add a few drops of calamansi, crush a siling labuyo (bird’s eye chili) for a spicy kick, and voila–you got the ultimate pulutan.

Just like adobo, versions abound everywhere, and of course it eventually made it a staple offer in most Filipino restaurants. While the common ingredients ain’t healthy, try making it with tuna, or bangus (milkfish) and you’ve got a delicious easy-to-eat meal! Continue reading “Bangus Sisig”