Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe

Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe

Pinaputok in Filipino kind of means “bursting” as in bursting in the seams. So in this recipe, the fish is stuffed with as much chopped onions and tomatoes as possible. Drizzled with a light butter mixture (or even anything as simple as oil, seasoned with salt and pepper) then wrapped in foil to cook–usually grilled, sometimes baked. The juices of the fish mix with the onions and tomatoes, trapped inside, giving the fish an ever so slightly enhanced, fresh and clean taste.

Continue reading “Pinaputok na Tilapia Recipe”

Cajun Shrimp Foil Bake

Cajun Shrimp Foil Bake

It was so weird for me to be browsing through Pinterest, seeing recipes that say Shrimp Boil Foil Bake / Grill and yet nothing in the procedure required any boiling. So Google it is. I learned that this dish comes from the widely popular Louisiana traditional seafood boil. They use crawfish, lobsters, and other kinds of seafood. Throw everything in a boiling pot of water, season it with paprika, cayenne pepper, lemons, and more. Add sausages, ears of corn, potatoes, onions, garlic. Oh my gosh, why have I never been to Louisiana? I’d really want to visit some day. Continue reading “Cajun Shrimp Foil Bake”

Rice Cooker Chicken Ginger Shiitake

Rice Cooker Chicken Ginger Shiitake

Growing up, I only knew two kinds of mushrooms: canned button mushrooms, and dried shiitake mushrooms. My mom would make either this kind of ginger-shiitake recipe, or  chicken in creamy mushroom sauce using button mushrooms. Whenever I ask mom to cook “that chicken with mushroom” dish, she’d always need to ask, “The shiitake or the creamy one?”

Because I didn’t know about other uses for shiitake back then, I used to think this recipe was quite complicated! A couple of years back I bought my first bag of dried shiitake and realized it was actually an easy recipe. LOL hi Google, I love you forever. Continue reading “Rice Cooker Chicken Ginger Shiitake”

Tapkilog: Korean Tapsilog

Tapkilog: Korean Tapsilog

I am an ex-Korean. I’m kidding. 

From 2006-2009, Korea was my second home. I flew for Asiana Airlines as a flight attendant. This job ultimately boosted my love for food as I got to try foreign dishes in their own country. I fell madly in love with Thai food from the sidewalks of Bangkok and Phuket, and have always remarked how different Vietnamese food is here than in, well, Vietnam.

Unsurprisingly, Korea made me love kimchi. Hardcore love kimchi, I tell you. I remember this one time on the way back to Korea from London, I bought a really yummy chocolate covered chocolate cake from Marks & Spencer. It was so good that I ate about four slices of it. Until it was too sweet, too chocolatey. I started looking for kimchi to counter that umay feeling. Continue reading “Tapkilog: Korean Tapsilog”

My-Stove-Broke Pasta

My-Stove-Broke Pasta

After ugly crying over my induction stove, I looked at the sadly half-sautéed chicken cubes in the pot. I don’t have a stove, what am I supposed to do with this now? Oven. I need to bake this instead. 

I’m pretty unfamiliar with baking dishes; I only got a countertop oven last year, and my first baking dish last week. Pulled out my brand-new baking dish, transferred the chicken with the onions and tomatoes. Now what?  Continue reading “My-Stove-Broke Pasta”

Chicken Pochero

Chicken Pochero

My list of posts to write is getting longer every day. Cooking daily but not blogging daily? Not a good match!

If you don’t know pochero (alternate spellings include “puchero” or “putsero”)…I don’t either. All I actually remember from pochero was that it was made with chicken, tomato based sauce, and that it had banana. My mom does not cook pochero, or most of the tomato based dishes, for that matter. Continue reading “Chicken Pochero”

Bangus Sisig

Bangus Sisig

Sisig is considered the perfect beer match. It’s usually made of liver, pig ears, and probably unimaginable things–all chopped and mixed (so you don’t actually know what you’re getting), cooked on a greasy hotplate and is sometimes topped with egg. Add a few drops of calamansi, crush a siling labuyo (bird’s eye chili) for a spicy kick, and voila–you got the ultimate pulutan.

Just like adobo, versions abound everywhere, and of course it eventually made it a staple offer in most Filipino restaurants. While the common ingredients ain’t healthy, try making it with tuna, or bangus (milkfish) and you’ve got a delicious easy-to-eat meal! Continue reading “Bangus Sisig”

Easy Rotisserie Chicken Salad

Easy Rotisserie Chicken Salad

Before I got into baking chicken breasts on weekends for our salads’ weekly supply, we used to make salads that didn’t have meat. The Filipino in me trying to find “ulam” in everything was craving meat; even tuna would have been better.

On some days I’d walk to S&R–which is pretty much what Costco is to other countries–and get us roasted chicken for dinner, and half of it will be rendered too much and in turn ready for salad making for the following days. Continue reading “Easy Rotisserie Chicken Salad”